Green Lizard's Blog

The planet is our home; we need to be more responsible. Here's what I do.

Bird Watching: Feed the birds Part 2

I filled our bird feeders the other day and vowed to try and get some pictures.

The theory was that I’d be able to improve my skills and experiment with the remote camera.

You’ll recognise immediately that my skills haven’t had much success but I had to share the goings on.

There was excitement when the dear chef spotted a woodpecker in the tree.
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The photo makes it hard to pick our in recognition of cheffies bionic eye sight and the peckers hiding skills. And of course in recognition that I was in the wrong room with the wrong equipment when the bird was noticed!

Then the same day in the back yard. This little fella took advantage of the same lack of readiness.

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It’s the Dunnock we saw often last year but who hasn’t been seen lately.

Very sweet and brave. The crows seem to rule in the back yard normally.

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Meanwhile the feeders have their normal green ringed visitors but they are evading the camera most of the time.

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And of course light is becoming an issue.

I still need to figure out how to get the smaller birds but I’m working on it.

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23 comments on “Bird Watching: Feed the birds Part 2

  1. AnnetteM
    October 2, 2014

    I too have just filled the feeders and am waiting for them to be discovered again. We don’t get many unusual birds at the feeders, though occasionally a group of goldfinches come for the niger seeds. They are lovely to see. I like the idea of a hanging spike for apples – must see if I can find one of those. I also need to get a protected feeder for the peanuts otherwise the squirrel eats them all and cost me a fortune! I will leave him a few though, but there should be plenty of nuts about at the moment.

    Like

    • lizard100
      October 2, 2014

      I think a squirrel might get into our protected feeder. The parrots put their heads in.

      Like

      • AnnetteM
        October 2, 2014

        I am glad we don’t have those parrots up in Scotland. I first thought they were beautiful when I first saw them, but I guess they can be rather a nuisance.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lizard100
        October 2, 2014

        I kind of like them. Given that they should not have survived it’s fascinating that they hold their own against the crows, survive the crows and are multiply.

        Like

      • AnnetteM
        October 2, 2014

        But I wonder what affect they are having on the native birds and the general ecosystem? They are surely eating food that would no longer be available for other birds.

        Like

      • lizard100
        October 2, 2014

        Yes but the eco system in general is destroyed. Cats by the dozen, gardens not intended to support wildlife, roads, cars, pollution, housing, non native planting… The whole thing is totally decimated. For me if any creature managed to thrive I find myself being impressed. Man has caused so much havoc

        Like

  2. ladyofthecakes
    October 2, 2014

    I can’t see it. The woodpecker! Where…?!

    Like

    • lizard100
      October 2, 2014

      It’s hiding in the branch. A black and white splodge. Assuming I put the right photo up of course!

      Like

      • ladyofthecakes
        October 2, 2014

        I hope you’re not planning on giving a bird photography masterclass any time soon… chickens being the exception, of course 😉

        Like

      • lizard100
        October 2, 2014

        Woodpeckers aren’t easy to get you know. And it wasn’t sticking around!

        Like

      • ladyofthecakes
        October 2, 2014

        I do know! They don’t come close enough, and even if they do, they don’t bloody hold still. Which is why I’ve given up on birds…

        Like

  3. Serena
    October 2, 2014

    Beautiful! Happy animals keep me happy! 🙂 Thank you x

    Like

  4. lizard100
    October 2, 2014

    Flam in’ birds!

    Like

  5. Helen
    October 2, 2014

    Good luck – I wish I could take photos of the birds that visit my garden but…. always too late or they are too small etc.

    Like

    • lizard100
      October 2, 2014

      It’s a bit of a gamble. I figure I might do a series based on the photos that I try to take over the colder months.

      Like

  6. tootlepedal
    October 2, 2014

    The colder days bring shorter light but less leaves to get in the way of the birds.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Rambling Woods
    October 3, 2014

    WInter allows for good photo opportunities through my window..but I can wait for that…

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Christina
    October 3, 2014

    We grew a bunch of sunflowers to feed the birds when it starts getting cold. if we fill the feeders in summer, the raccoons just rip them apart to get the seeds. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

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