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How to extract honey too thick to spin out of a perfectly good extractor

This one is definitely worth sharing. It’s solved a question on another blog I’ve read recently.

Mrs Apis Mellifera

010

“We lost almost an entire crop to rapeseed one year,” said Patrice. We were talking about the really thick honey that Emily and I had been unable to spin out in an extractor. “There is most likely rapeseed in the honey.” Patrice had seen rapeseed growing in the area local to the apiary, she thought it was probably spread around by birds who ate the seeds and left their droppings elsewhere.

Three years ago on a warm and sunny Saturday afternoon, Emily and I took six frames of honey off the same hive and got in a cab to my dad’s house to extract it straightaway. The honey wouldn’t spin out and instead we made cut comb honey in mini jars.

mini-comb-pot

The following spring we visited the Chelsea Physic Garden’s honey tasting session and brought a pot of honey for expert honey taster and beekeeper Peter James. He took…

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11 comments on “How to extract honey too thick to spin out of a perfectly good extractor

  1. Emma Sarah Tennant
    September 6, 2014

    Thank you for the reblog, glad you enjoyed this post and I’m looking forward to finding out how our bees have made this mystery honey 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lizard100
      September 6, 2014

      It was really interesting!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Emma Sarah Tennant
        September 6, 2014

        It’s been a interesting summer! And a lot of fun, thanks for coming along for the adventures with our bees 🙂

        Like

      • lizard100
        September 6, 2014

        Our bees have also had an unusual summer!

        Like

      • Emma Sarah Tennant
        September 7, 2014

        So I’ve seen! Thinking of doing a roundup of bee adventures later this autumn… What’s surprised you most about the bees this year?

        Like

      • lizard100
        September 7, 2014

        The number of swarms we had eleven I think was quite a surprise. We’ve also been impressed by the way the EFB colony has recovered. And one swarm that was in a tree give days before a willing beek could be found to collect them.

        Like

      • Emma Sarah Tennant
        September 7, 2014

        11 swarms! There’s definitely more about this instinct that we need to learn about. Amazing!

        Like

      • lizard100
        September 7, 2014

        That’s ultimately it. For me the colony is so complex and so smart. We can only scrape the surface of their instincts, choices and behaviour. Our TBH had sixteen queens when they replaced a queen after a swarm this year too. Remarkable!

        Like

      • Emma Sarah Tennant
        September 8, 2014

        16 queens – that must have been one almighty battle!

        Like

      • lizard100
        September 8, 2014

        It was a big scrap!

        Like

  2. Pingback: How to extract honey too thick to spin out of a perfectly good extractor | Linda's wildlife garden

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