Green Lizard's Blog

The planet is our home; we need to be more responsible. Here's what I do.

Honey harvest on the cheap!

The process of being a beekeeper is great fun. You learn something, you meet people, you find out all about lots of different things that you didn’t expect. Like plants and bees and honey.

but it’s not the cheapest hobby!

Aside from the investment in the hive and beekeeping clothing and other equipment, you also need to think about harvesting.

Sometimes, if you’re part of a beekeeping club, you can borrow equipment and that does help keep costs down.

Harvesting equipment including a Honey spinner can set you back quite a lot of money. This may be an investment beyond the reach of your wallet especially at the start of your beekeeping career.

We’ve managed to start harvesting honey without going through the beekeeping catalogues and spending a fortune.

Here’s how we did it.

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In the photo you can see the one key item to help us harvest is an electric drill. We also used some sieves, a plastic container that we adapted with a special tap, and a large bin.

Honey is harvested with a centrifuge system. First of all you need to open the capped comb. You can either do this with a knife, special comb or other various pieces of equipment.

A normal kitchen knife does it very well.

We created a special frame to hold the uncapped honey frames out of metal.

This fits into the place on the drill where the bit would normally be.

We place two frames of honey into this contraption then attach the drill and gently spin inside a bucket.

The delicious honey flies out onto the sides of the bin and then drips down the inside.

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Then we turn the two frames around and spin again so the honey on the other side of the comb is extracted successfully.

Later on we’ll use a specially adapted plastic container with the honey tap on the side to divide the honey into each of the sterile jars.

This time we had 9 kg of honey to extract from the frames. There were only eight frames in total. So this was an ideal solution for a fairly small quantities honey.

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20 comments on “Honey harvest on the cheap!

  1. Expat Eye
    June 1, 2014

    You’re the MacGyver of beekeeping 😉

    Like

    • lizard100
      June 1, 2014

      Yehar! Ductape, we should’ve used ductape! More like the A team!

      Like

  2. lindaswildlifegarden
    June 1, 2014

    Reblogged this on Linda's wildlife garden and commented:
    Awesome post and thank you for sharing have a blessed day

    Like

  3. mylatinnotebook
    June 1, 2014

    Makes our current efforts seem a bit amateurish….

    Like

  4. Rambling Woods
    June 1, 2014

    Love your creativity

    Like

  5. quarteracrelifestyle
    June 1, 2014

    This is so timely! Roger and I were disc, thanks!!ussing yesterday how we would harvest our honey without having to pay for someone to come and do it (buying the equipment is out of the question). Roger is “thinking on it”. This is great and an idea we shall steal, ta 🙂

    Like

    • lizard100
      June 2, 2014

      It’s not too difficult to do but the basket that holds the frames is the tricky part!

      Like

  6. tootlepedal
    June 1, 2014

    Ingenious.

    Like

  7. Pingback: Winter arrives…. | quarteracrelifestyle

  8. Pingback: Honey, I jarred the harvest! | Green Lizard's Blog

  9. bcparkison
    June 23, 2014

    Great idea on the spinner. We got ours at a great price and will probably never find another bargan quite as good. Two frame reversable ,,hard to find now days.

    Like

    • lizard100
      June 23, 2014

      Yes. If you can get a bargain on any equipment it’s a fresh thing.

      Like

  10. madpam
    August 17, 2014

    I wish I had the skills to make this. I live alone and the metal bits defeat me. At the moment I rely on scouring it out and then seperating the cappings.

    Like

    • lizard100
      August 17, 2014

      It’s tricky. The professional spinners are very expensive. But maybe not so bad second hand.

      Like

    • lizard100
      August 17, 2014

      Have you tried using a salad spinner? That could help the staring process.

      Like

    • lizard100
      August 17, 2014

      Hey Pam. Look at this. It seems a bit mad but the demonstration pictures. (After all that weird maths) are actually not too bad.

      Like

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