Green Lizard's Blog

The planet is our home; we need to be more responsible. Here's what I do.

Why did the toad cross the road?

Water is a known feature of the Dutch landscape. It’s there alongside every road and pathway.

There are canals and ditches close by, channeling water into a complex network of interconnected drainage systems.

With them comes opportunity for habitat for all manner of life.

There are swans, coots and other water fowl. Meanwhile wee beasties join the party too.

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On our way home on Sunday night we spotted these torch bearing local heroes.

It’s time for the toad patrol.

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The overstekkend padden migrate locally to spawn.

Tonight we set out to do our bit.

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This one was lucky.

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Three toads successfully seen across the road. Many more unsuccessful.

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Here’s hoping the toad patrol save many more.

This blog has lots more info about it but in Dutch! blog

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20 comments on “Why did the toad cross the road?

  1. litadoolan
    March 29, 2014

    Enjoyed this interesting and insightful blog. I hadn’t thought how amphibians would thrive in cities with canals. More power to toad patrol.

    Like

    • lizard100
      March 29, 2014

      It’s difficult. Many don’t make it. But thus way more do.

      Like

      • litadoolan
        March 29, 2014

        Animals can be so fragile in the urban environment. It’s sad because they more than hold their own in the wild! Having said that our parks are over run with badass grey squirrels!!

        Like

      • lizard100
        March 29, 2014

        Humanity creates so much death and disruption.

        Like

      • litadoolan
        March 29, 2014

        We seem to have developed a bit of a skill for it!! Hearty cheers to your eco friendly project. You have a lot to feel good about! 😀

        Like

      • lizard100
        March 30, 2014

        That’s very true. Makes you feel good.

        Like

      • litadoolan
        March 30, 2014

        😀

        Like

  2. lindaswildlifegarden
    March 29, 2014

    Reblogged this on Linda's wildlife garden and commented:
    we do the same here in England too

    Like

  3. tootlepedal
    March 29, 2014

    Well done for doing your bit.

    Like

  4. Rambling Woods
    March 30, 2014

    Well…I love this… On a smaller scale we do help amphibians across the way even the crabby snapping turtles

    Like

  5. Expat Eye
    March 30, 2014

    Toad patrol. I’ve seen it all now! 🙂

    Like

    • lizard100
      March 30, 2014

      Yep. Old ladies with buckets and torches. You’d be forgiven for thinking they wee up to no good!

      Like

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